This “House Of Cards” Quiz Will Determine Which Character Is Your Soulmate

You got: Frank Underwood

You are a real BOSS just like Frank, and a natural born leader. You are focused, strategic, and very, very smart. Hard work, determination, and perseverance are tools you use to get what you want. Taking “no” for an answer is completely out of the question.

Frank Underwood
Netflix

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Claire Underwood

You’re a total badass just like Claire. You are stylish, gorgeous, and always have a plan B. You’re always there to help out people you love, but at the end of the day, you keep your best interest in mind.

Claire Underwood
Netflix

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Remy

You demand trust and respect from those around you. Your circle is tight but your sources are wide. You’re well liked by many, and people come to you for advice whenever they need it and you always deliver.

Remy
Netflix

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Zoe Barnes

You’re curious, always looking for the real answers to things and trying to get to the bottom of what’s going on

Zoe Barnes
Netflix

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Doug

You get shit done! You are typically the brains behind the operation and are always willing to help out your friends in need. You’re also extremely trustworthy, and people can always rely on you.

Doug
Netflix

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

We're Getting An Alanis Morissette Musical And Everything's Gonna Be Fine, Fine, Fine

Not to mention “Head Over Feet,” “All I Want,” “You Learn,” and many more emotionally raw anthems of angst that made then-21-year-old Morissette the youngest ever Album of the Year winner at the Grammys and propelled her to stardom. If you grew up in the ’90s, there’s a very good chance you scrawled these lyrics into a notebook at some point.

Write A Message From “A” And We'll Tell You Which Pretty Little Liar You Are

You got: Hanna

You’ve got a killer closet, can crank out some perfect one-liners at just the right moment, and have exactly zero time for bullshit.

HannaTap to play GIF
Tap to play GIF
Freeform / giphy.com

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Aria

You’re willing to protect yourself and what you want at all times, even if that means betraying those closest to you. But don’t worry, you always find your way back to the right path.

AriaTap to play GIF
Tap to play GIF
Freeform

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Spencer

Your fearlessness, intellect, and wit help you master even the most difficult situations. But sometimes you let your perfectionism get the best of you.

SpencerTap to play GIF
Tap to play GIF
Freeform / fellinlovewithblue.tumblr.com

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Emily

Incredibly selfless and caring, there’s nothing you wouldn’t do for your closest friends and family. Your strength and courage is honestly remarkable, and you should be proud AF of that.

EmilyTap to play GIF
Tap to play GIF
Freeform / giphy.com

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

You got: Alison

There’s a sneaky, sly, manipulative side to you, but when you truly love someone, no one is more caring than you.

AlisonTap to play GIF
Tap to play GIF
Freeform

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.


Get the app

“Wonder Woman” Is Good, Praise Zeus


Clay Enos/Warner Bros.

Gal Gadot as Diana in Wonder Woman.

Wonder Woman does not go undercover easily.

In what’s maybe the most gratifyingly funny interlude in Patty Jenkins’ new film, the Amazon — real name Diana (Gal Gadot) — tries on a series of 1910s-London-appropriate outfits at the behest of Steve Trevor (Chris Pine, really as charming as he’s ever been), an American spy working for British intelligence who’s attempting to get his new colleague to do some blending in.

Diana submits herself to the doomed exercise with anthropological curiosity, hoisting up ruffled skirts to see how they perform during kicks, dismissing a high collar as itchy and confining, and finally emerging in an outfit that was clearly intended to come off as prim, but instead looks fabulously bluestocking chic. Steve retaliates by reaching for the go-to accessory of all superheroes in preposterous normcore disguise — glasses. “Really? Specs?” his beleaguered secretary Etta Candy (Lucy Davis) groans. “And suddenly she’s not the most beautiful woman you’ve ever seen?”


Clay Enos/Warner Bros.

Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) and Diana (Gadot).

Diana is a battle-trained, semi-divine, and, yes, statuesquely lovely princess from a mystical island inhabited only by female warriors. There is no hiding her light under a barrel in Wonder Woman, an endearingly earnest film whose biggest surprises come from how much it diverges in tone and style from the earlier superhero installments with which it shares a fictional world.

In playing catch-up with Marvel’s inescapable franchise of linked movies, DC made the pragmatic choice to skip right from Man of Steel to the big stuff, to supergroup movies Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad — cynical, aggressively dark productions plagued with confounding motivations, odd tonal choices, and too many characters to service. It was in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice that Gadot’s Wonder Woman was introduced, in a set of appearances that included a scene in which she sits at a laptop and effectively watches teasers for future DC Extended Universe installments.

Elegantly done it was not, though Diana and her niftily cello-forward musical theme made an impression in even squandered screen time, there amidst the brooding men and their memories of their mothers. She seemed to enjoy herself, something neither the recent, world-weary conceptions of Batman or Superman could say.

What’s striking about her turn in the spotlight in Wonder Woman, beyond its milestone status as a female-centric studio superhero feature directed by a woman, is the movie’s sense of elated lightness. Aside from the clunky framing device featuring a present-day Diana working at the Louvre, Wonder Woman is freed up to tell a straightforward origin story that takes its title character from a childhood on the Amazon island of Themyscira into the tail end of World War I.


Alex Bailey/Warner Bros.

Antiope (Robin Wright)

It’s a saga, written by Allan Heinberg, with a decent sense of humor, which any story prominently featuring Zeus and a Lasso of Truth demand. Wonder Woman is as outlandish as she is awe-inspiring, and everyone she comes into contact with from the outside world regards her with the appropriate mixture of admiration and disbelief.

That includes Steve, the first man she’s ever met and her eventual romantic interest, who brings that outside world right onto Themyscira’s unspoiled beaches when his plane plummets into the waters nearby, with German forces in pursuit. A fight between the interlopers and the Amazons, led by General Antiope (a brawny, braid-sporting Robin Wright), provides evidence of the women’s leaping, archery-enhanced prowess as well as the ugly power of guns.

It’s enough to spur Diana to act against the wishes of her mother, Queen Hippolyta’s (Connie Nielsen), and leave the island with Steve to fulfill what she believes is her duty and destiny: to kill Ares, the Greek god of war. Ares, she’s convinced, is the cause of the all-consuming conflict Steve’s described to her — World War I. She believes the only reason “the war to end all wars” could be happening is due to Ares’ influence, and that once she defeats him, the violence will be over.

DC’s Wonder Woman, like Marvel’s Captain America, was a character originally conceived during World War II, both of them brawling with Nazis and sporting outfits that evoked the American flag. Wonder Woman’s shift to the first World War feels like an attempt to create some distance from the unavoidable Captain America: The First Avenger comparisons evoked by the plunking of another superhero into period battle, finding comic book–worthy foes hiding amidst the historical ones.


Clay Enos/Warner Bros.

Sameer (Saïd Taghmaoui), Steve (Pine), Diana (Gadot), Chief (Eugene Brave Rock), and Charlie (Ewen Bremner).

Like Captain America, Diana is an idealist who’s strong in her convictions but also inexperienced, driven by an untested certainty that she knows what’s right. For someone who’s just stepping off the isolated island on which she grew up for the first time, she’s recklessly sure she knows what’s best for everyone else, that all it will take is the destruction of the right bad guy — whether it’s the German Gen. Ludendorff (Danny Huston), his poison gas-manufacturing chemist Doctor Maru (Elena Anaya), or someone else.

War has yet to be eradicated from either the movieverse or the real one, so it’s not news that the situation ends up being more complicated than she assumed. Which comes as a shock to no one but Diana herself, after she finagles a way out to the front with Steve and his trustiest mercenary friends — the silver-tongued Sameer (Saïd Taghmaoui), the Scottish sharpshooter Charlie (Ewen Bremner), and the Native American smuggler Chief (Eugene Brave Rock). They’re a seen-it-all crew who, of course, reveal their hearts of gold right when Diana’s confidence is shaken and, along with it, her conception of mankind as fundamentally good unless tainted by forces of evil.


Clay Enos/Warner Bros.

Diana (Gadot) and General Ludendorff (Danny Huston).

Diana, with her fantastical Hellenic backstory, has less explicitly patriotic roots than the military-created Captain America, but in Wonder Woman she serves as an affecting riff on American ideology anyway: She’s a well-intended but naive interventionist, an outsider crashing into a political quagmire she doesn’t really understand but is certain she can fix anyway, sure the solution is as simple as the correct baddie getting killed off.

That’s why, perhaps, her first appearance on the battlefield is so moving (while her climactic conflict is bigger but comparatively underwhelming): Stepping out onto no-man’s-land in full regalia and facing down enemy machine guns in order to free an occupied village, she could be a fantasy of the US as we’d like to imagine ourselves — larger than life, always able to ascertain the truth, and driven by a desire to help that is pure and conveniently unambiguous (no endless counterinsurgency campaigns for her!).

It’s the kind of sequence that can give you goosebumps and provoke a few tears — Wonder Woman emerging from the trenches to save the day. She has the staunchness of someone who sees the world in neat black and white…until she’s forced to consider whether she still feels invested in a humanity capable of doing harm without the influence of a god. Naturally, that god does eventually turn up, because a movie like this needs closure, even if the lesson its heroine learns is that there’s no such thing.

Who knows how Diana will handle it when the Nazis — in whose shadow she was created — come along, or what she does during the murky global conflicts that follow World War II. Fortunately for her, for now, the DCEU is intent on skipping forward to the present day to Justice League, and then Aquaman, and on and on to the less defined future, presuming the world doesn’t end. Because of Wonder Woman, the film and the character, that grand corporate plan doesn’t seem quite as hubristic; she doesn’t feel like another bewilderingly warped, barely recognizable take on an iconic character. She feels like a genuine superhero, intent on protecting those in need — you can tell, even when she’s wearing glasses.

How “Shots Fired” Kept The Fight For Social Justice Alive

When Fox first announced the limited-run series Shots Fired, Barack Obama was president, Loretta Lynch was in charge of the Department of Justice, and the tragic deaths of black people in the US, like Alton Sterling and Terence Crutcher, at the hands of cops put police and prison reform at the forefront of national conversation. Fast-forward seven months, one Trump inauguration, and 10 episodes later, when Shots Fired, which explored the relationship between law enforcement and civilians, came to a striking conclusion in a very different environment. From March through May, it seemed like the longest and most nuanced discussion about discrimination against black people was happening on the series.

While there are subjects Shots Fired only touched on, like Twitter’s role in social justice, husband-and-wife producing team Gina Prince-Bythewood and Reggie Rock Bythewood captured many subtleties in their exploration of community organization. In its story of two DOJ employees investigating the shootings of two unarmed teenagers (one white, one black), Shots Fired addressed both the way the black community tends to feel — no matter how they organize, it’ll be an issue for conservative America — and how criticisms of black people protesting often steer close to respectability politics.

Throughout its run, Shots Fired showed step by step how tension within the fictional Gate Station, North Carolina, bubbled up until riots erupted in the “The Fire This Time” episode, directed by the late Jonathan Demme. Rock Bythewood told BuzzFeed News the riot was a moment earned after the first half of the series provided “insight into the frustration that a community can feel leading to that.” He added that he and Prince-Bythewood were “inspired by the Dr. King quote, ‘A riot is a language of the unheard,’” a concept they embraced throughout the series.

Another moment that toed the line of those respectability politics was when Shameeka Campbell (DeWanda Wise), the mother of one of the slain teenagers the show focused on, scolded her fellow protesters for suggesting another riot after a court decision did not go in her favor. The moment didn’t suggest Shameeka was diminishing the crowd’s anger, but rather focused on her awakening as an activist, Rock Bythewood noted. To create the character of Shameeka, the couple visited and had conversations with Wanda Johnson, the mother of Oscar Grant III, who was killed by police on a BART Station platform after a cop mistakenly grabbed his gun instead of his taser. Shameeka represented all the mothers of slain unarmed black civilians who were “thrust into the limelight and had to transition from being mothers to activists,” Rock Bythewood said.

The Bythewoods also took inspiration from a real-life case in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where the sheriff’s department had a program through which wealthy donors were given police-issued guns and tasers, and the chance to police black neighborhoods, until one of the participants, referred to as “reserve deputies,” killed an unarmed man — and the sheriff’s department staged a massive coverup. Rock Bythewood said that while the investigation brought the sheriff down, “clearly there were a lot of people within the police department that knew about it and covered it up.”

One of the biggest rewards for Rock Bythewood in making Shots Fired was the way it resonated with people in that Tulsa community. “There’s a former DOJ official who is working to use Shots Fired as learning tool for police officers, and we love that,” Rock Bythewood said. “It’s something that we never saw coming, but that would be very gratifying.”

Prince-Bythewood said she and Rock Bythewood were not interested in creating a television series; it wasn’t even on their radar. But with the recent popularity of limited series like Top of the Lake and True Detective, the Bythewoods realized TV would give them the space to tell the stories they had been developing in a more fruitful way. “The fact that we had this opportunity to tell a story like this about the subject matter the way we wanted to tell it. … It’s just been a really incredible experience,” Prince-Bythewood said. Rock Bythewood used to think that there were things film could do that television just couldn’t. “But in this limited series, it’s actually flipped,” he said. “What we’re able to do in this limited series is something we couldn’t do in film.” The plan was to look at Shots Fired as “as a 10-hour film, a 10-hour series,” Prince-Bythewood said. “That dictated the way we wrote it and the way we cast it, the directors that we brought in.”

The Bythewoods needed the extra hours to dissect the complicated issues Shots Fired ultimately tackles. By the finale — which aired on May 24 and cut between the court decisions for the indictments of the teen boys’ killers and flashbacks of what actually happened those nights — they had successfully “dug deep into all the characters and gave them all great arcs, gave every character a beginning, middle, and end,” Rock Bythewood said.

Even though Shots Fired is over, Rock Bythewood said the bigger fight is not. The Department of Justice under Lynch, he said, knew to “not just speak with officers, but to speak with members of the community, speak with activists that are really concerned with policing in communities of color,” and to start “looking at various police departments and their patterns of practice.” But, Rock Bythewood added, “it is very important for people to be mindful of the fact that Jeff Sessions is pulling back on that.”

Why Director Patty Jenkins Left Marvel’s “Thor 2”

Just months after Marvel confirmed the news, however, Jenkins departed the project, citing “creative differences,” with no further explanation.

Many unnamed sources speculated about the reason behind Jenkins’ exit, and until now, the filmmaker had never revealed what she had envisioned for the Thor sequel, which Alan Taylor ultimately took over.

“I pitched them that I wanted to do Romeo and Juliet. I wanted Jane to be stuck on Earth and Thor to be stuck where he is. And Thor to be forbidden to come and save Jane because Earth doesn’t matter. And then by coming to save her … they end up discovering that Malekith is hiding the dark energy inside of Earth because he knows that Odin doesn’t care about Earth, and so he’s using Odin’s disinterest in Earth to trick him,” she said.

“And so it was like, I wanted it to be a grand [movie] based on Romeo and Juliet … a war between the gods and the earthlings, and Thor saves the day and ends up saving Earth.”

BuzzFeed News has reached out to Marvel for comment.

Brad Pitt Has Strong Feelings About Sending More Troops Into America's Longest War

Brad Pitt is a military man in his new movie War Machine. The actor, who also produced the new Netflix film, plays Gen. Glenn McMahon, a headstrong leader with a lot of bravado and a bevy of die-hard loyalists. The character — who is based on the real-life Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal — is called into the war in Afghanistan, which by then had been raging for eight years. Tasked to “assess” the ongoing conflict, McMahon soon promises to do what no one else could do in that country: win the war.

The movie, set in 2009, plays out after the White House gives Gen. McMahon more than 30,000 US and NATO troops, a number he claims can end the war. Skepticism abounds, and the surge only ends up serving to highlight the hubris fueling the war.

War Machine is proving to be prescient.

Post-surge in real life, Taliban emerged stronger, ISIS moved into Afghanistan, and the Afghan troops have struggled to secure their country. Now, the US is again considering sending more troops to Afghanistan. This time, the US military has concluded that roughly 5,000 more troops can end what the current top commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. John Nicholson, called a “stalemate.” The Trump administration is expected to formally announce its strategy shortly after today’s NATO meeting in Brussels.

War Machine, which is out in select theaters and on Netflix tomorrow (May 26), is based on “The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan” by journalist Michael Hastings, whose 2010 story in Rolling Stone led to McChrystal’s resignation.

Earlier this month, BuzzFeed News presented a screening of War Machine and a moderated Q&A with Pitt, national security journalist and Hastings’ widow Elise Jordan, and with other War Machine filmmakers. NYU undergrads studying media to politics were invited to observe the discussion about the movie and what it portends for the way ahead in America’s longest war.

In the clip above, Pitt and Jordan talk about why the surge didn’t work then – and what War Machine says about repeating that strategy again.